Markets

Markets in Gran Canaria vary from the huge Fridays extravaganza at Puerto Mogán to tiny local markets where you only find fresh local produce. We think everyone should visit a local market in Gran Canaria as they are a window into how Canarians live. 

Here's a selection of the markets in Gran Canaria and lots of info on the best things to buy and try. 

Most people who visit Gran Canaria love to visit local markets so here's our guide to all the regular markets in Mogán, Arguineguín and Puerto Rico.  
The three main local markets in Las Palmas sell all kinds of fresh produce from local fruit and vegetables to fish, cheese and coffee. Here’s our guide to all of Las Palmas city’s daily and weekly markets.
It's in a warehouse and you can't call it pretty but San Mateo market sells the widest range of local produce available anywhere in Gran Canaria.
Santa Brigida weekend market is where Las Palmas' well-to-do go to be seen buying their fruit and vegetables. The fruit and veg are good, but prices are higher than at San Lorenzo or San Mateo. There's even an organic food stall.
If there's a rural idyll in south Gran Canaria, then it's Santa Lucia with it's mountain scenery and palm-filled valleys. The Sunday morning market is a local affair and there's always seasonal produce on offer at superb prices.
Tunte or San Bartolome de Tirajana market is a local affair held in the hill town early every Sunday morning. 
San Fernando market is one of the big three in south Gran Canaria along with Puerto Mgán and Arguineguín. The location isn't as pretty as its rivals but it's far more convenient if you're staying in Playa del Inglés or Maspalomas. The stalls here sell everything from local produce to…
Arguineguín market is one of the big three in south Gran Canaria along with Mogán and San Fernando and fills the town every Tuesday morning. The stalls are all along the seafront on the cement factory side of town.  Most stall holders at Arguineguín also work the Puerto Mogán and…
Puerto Mogán on a Friday is the island's biggest outdoor market with stalls all along through the town and along the harbour wall. There's hundreds of stalls selling everything from embroidery to fresh fruit and vegetables and you're bound to find something to take home. Combine it with lunch in…
The weekend markets at Santa Brigida and San Mateo are so popular these days that there's traffic jams on the road up. Fortunatley there's a Sunday alternative close to Las Palmas that doesn't get the crowds. San Lozenzo market has about 20 stalls and is a genuine farmer's market with all produce grown…
San Mateo market, rather like the town, is a workhorse of a place that put efficiency ahead of aesthetics. Set in a whopping great warehouse it offers a huge range of local produce, has a good wine stall, and is the cheapest of the big north Gran Canaria markets.  Despite…
Puerto Mogán massive Friday market is so crowded that there's now a Monday handicraft market in the town as well. This focuses on handmade goods and all stallholders have to be certified as local handicraft producers. The Monday Mogán market is behind the beach rather than along the harbour wall.…

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Tip of the day

  • Tip Of The Day: Avoid Bank Card Charges By Paying In Euros
    Tip Of The Day: Avoid Bank Card Charges By Paying In Euros

    Save money and avoid rip-off bank charges while in Gran Canaria by paying in euros when using your credit or debit card.

    Many bars and restaurants in Gran Canaria, and in almost all European holiday destinations, give you the option of paying in euros or in your home currency. Opting for your own currency, while it may seem like the safer option, can add as much as 5% to the bill as it triggers dynamic currency conversion. 

    DCC basically means that the exchange rate is calculated at point of sale rather than by your bank. It allows you to see the total cost of the transaction in your own currency but adds up to 5% to the total because it uses a terrible exchange rate. 

    Since the extra money is shared between your bank and the merchant, some places will automatically bill you in your own currency and hope you don't notice. You have the legal right to refuse and void the transaction should this happen. 

    ATMs too

    The same applies when taking money out of ATM machines in Gran Canaria (and anywhere in Europe); Always choose the local currency option to avoid losing money to poor exchange rates.

    If you opt for the local currency option, using bank ATMs is often the cheapest and safest way of getting euros in Gran Canaria. It's far safer than having a big pile of euros hidden in your room or tucked into your shorts.

    More details in this Daily Telegraph article.

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